11 November 2006

Six rupees

That's how much Baby Naaz's family of five earns in a good day, cutting about 240 rubber slipper straps.

Six rupees for three meals for five people.

If it weren't so tragic, it would have made for a brain-racking puzzle.

(Part of ongoing work for a local NGO here. With luck, should be able to post all the stories here in the coming weeks.)

11 comments:

AakASH!!! said...

For once i dont know what to say. Will come back to read more.

Viju said...

Please do, and welcome :)

Anonymous said...

thought i'd tell: this isnt about monetarism (numerics; how little daily wages is 'sad'). but rights. and basic universal services; right to daily meals, clean water, education, information. If Rs1000 a day cannot ensure access to any of this; you see it was never a matter of how much money.
*finn

Vijayalaxmi said...

I dont understand: when did human rights get divorced from economic ones?

And strictly speaking, Rs 1,000 a day could get them meals, (relatively) clean water, and education. Cant say the same about information, though.

It has always been a matter of how much money.

Anonymous said...

oops. dont mean to sound arrogant. but pick up a primer on economics. also 1000 can buy them that sure. but are we forgetting public amenities? and thats for those who dont match that peg u put. youre not just talking about money but a lot of money. i'm saying basic services, no matter how much money one makes. avlatha

Viju said...

Please define public amenities.

Or, never mind, you are beyond me.

Anonymous said...

i can go down my road and use the water pump for water, carry it back home and use it for whatever. i didnt have to pay for it. i could have also used the privatised water. and i'd pay it in the bill.

Viju said...

My question still is: how are 'basic universal services' unrelated to money/power?

Anonymous said...

(ration cards for subsidized grains. the moneyed dont need it. but some ppl depend on it.) Basic Universal Services bypass the singular claim of money/power. A capitalist market (to even a small degree) gives you the variety and frills but such socilaist initiatives recognize the very basic bemefit must not be denied to those who cannot sustain purchases of that kind.

Anonymous said...

i mean the basic no-frills necessity; rice

Viju said...

I frankly wish your sentences could be clearer. I have but average IQ, you see.

Now, assuming I have understood you, my hunch is we are talkin about the same thing.

I'll leave it at that.